Indonesia Country Report

Policy Lever: Harnessing Public Balance Sheets

Goverments are using their public balance sheets to provide fiscal incentives, risk guarantees or public investment in ways that improve the risk adjusted returns of green investment and seek to 'crowd-in' private investors.  Incentivizing sustainable finance through the use of the public balance sheet has been a feature in every country reviewed by the Inquiry.

Examples

Steps that can be taken to develop new green investment incentives, or to align existing incentives to sustainable development include: 
  • Target fiscal support: Establishing and optimising fiscal incentives to mobilize private capital for green investment.
  • Review fiscal incentives: Reviewing the alignment of existing fiscal incentives for savings, investment, lending and insurance with sustainability.
  • Sustainability mandates of public financial institutions: Strengthening sustainability as part of the mission and operation of development finance institutions and sovereign wealth funds.
  • Establish new green institutions: Launching new green investment banks and funds.
  • Blended finance instruments: Developing and using financial instruments designed to share risks and overcome barriers to private investment (such as through risk underwriting & results based financing).
  • Central banks refinancing operations: Extending refinancing operations to include green assets.
  • Central bank asset purchase programmes: Incorporating sustainability factors into asset purchase programmes.
  • Public procurement criteria: Introducing sustainable development performance into procurement of financial services by the public sector.

 Impacts

These measures are widely adopted and can be effective, but the scale of new funding available is limited. Nevertheless the financial system is already the recipient of, and conduit for, significant public financial support, which has the potential to be aligned to sustainable development.      

Inquiry Publications

  • Indonesia Country Report

    Date: 30-Apr-2015

    Placing Indonesia’s economy onto a green and sustainable development pathway, as envisaged in the National Long Term Development Plan, will require a large mobilization of investment. Estimates of the annual investment needed are in the order of US$300‐530 billion, with a large portion of this investment needed in critical infrastructure, as well as environmentally sensitive

  • Bangladesh Country Report

    Date: 09-Oct-2015

    Bangladesh has been a leader in developing policies to shape a greener and more inclusive financial system. It has a suite of green banking regulations and policies including concessional green refinancing, credit quotas for green finance and guidance and requirements on environmental due diligence. Green finance is growing but it remains modest compared to the scale of Bangladesh’s

  • China Report

    Date: 06-Oct-2015

    The Inquiry collaborated in an 18-month project, Greening China’s Financial System, carried out by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Finance Research Institute (FRI), Development Research Center (DRC) of the State Council. The aim was to develop specific proposals for greening China’s financial system, based on an analysis of current practice in China

  • UK Country Report

    Date: 14-Jan-2016

    This paper looks at the steps that the UK has taken towards a sustainable financial system shaped by its role as a global financial centre and a distinctive dynamic between social entrepreneurs and civil society organisations, market innovation and policy frameworks.The City of London is not only home to some of the world’s largest financial markets, but

  • US Country Report

    Date: 11-Feb-2016

    While US financial institutions have at times enjoyed a reputation of being something of a laggard on sustainability issues versus their European counterparts, significant changes and innovations are under way which are beginning to drive meaningful change. Record levels of awareness on sustainability issues in the US, including from millennials, are accelerating activities such as: Increased levels of

  • Green Finance Progress Report

    Date: 11-Jul-2017

    The G20 Green Finance Synthesis Report adopted at the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou in September 2016 set out seven options identified by the G20 Green Finance Study Group (GFSG) to accelerate the mobilization of green finance. This paper highlights some of the progress made against these seven options in G20 members and internationally since June 2016.

  • 3rd Update Report: Pathways to Scale

    Date: 07-Jan-2015

    This is the 3rd Update Report of the UNEP Inquiry, it is focused on the challenge of financing the low-carbon transition. It explores how innovative ideas and practices can be made more effective, adopted more widely, and taken to scale—and as a result move the trillions that are required. Scaling-up proven but limited innovations, is a common

  • Central Banks Can and Should Do Their Part in Funding Sustainability

    Date: 10-Jun-2014

    In this paper Andrew Sheng argues that central banks, when purchasing financial assets, should consider selecting assets that will promote sustainability, including climate change mitigation and adaptation. Social impact investing he argues is consistent with a central bank’s mandate to maintain price stability. They could incentivize bankers and asset managers to invest in, or lend to, climate mitigation activities and low-emission

  • China Green Finance Task Force Report: Green Banking System

    Date: 02-Apr-2015

    This paper sets out the case for establishing a green banking system in China. It recommends the establishment of a system of green banks empowered to fully leverage their expertise, scale, and risk management to manage green loans and investments. A China Ecological Development Bank should be established in which the government does not have to have a

  • Roadmap for a Sustainable Financial System

    Date: 20-Apr-2017

    CALL FOR CONSULTATION UN Environment and the World Bank Group view the over-arching objective of a sound financial system as being to provide finance that meets the long-term needs of an inclusive, environmentally sustainable economy. While there is no single blueprint or unique pathway for creating such a “sustainable financial system”, it is possible to describe

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